Sunday, October 08, 2006

Virgin actor?

I was alerted to this story in the SMH by a mate of mine and then saw the same story on Rocco's blog. The best report so far is here and from New Zealand. In summary, the 16-year old actress who plays the Virgin Mary in a film soon to be released is pregnant. How ironic. It's nearly as good as the Indian producer who wanted to cast Paris Hilton as Mother Theresa. It is such a shame that the girl hasn't appeared to have got anything out of playing the part. But then again, at least it appears that she will keep the baby rather than an abortion. Must thank God for that.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

And what exactly would you have hoped for her to "get out of playing the part"?

aaron said...

That the experience would give spur some sense of morals or better still faith and Truth.

Anonymous said...

Honestly, I don't see how playing a role in a movie of this nature would be any different to an actor playing any another role. For example, should we expect the voice of Nemo suddenly assume the mannerisms of a pre-pubescent goldfish? As for morals, I think morality is more subjective and just because one is sexually active outside of marriage does no make one immoral. There are many things I would consider more immoral- torture, the death of civilians in warfare etc. I do not feel that it is the place of mortals to judge others, is it not stated, "let he who is without sin cast the first stone"?

Patrick said...

Well, anonymous, you are entitled to your own opinion on what is 'more immoral', but how can you legitimately hold others to such standards if you think morality is subjective? That kind of defeats the purpose, does it not? Furthermore, I think you are imputing vicious motives to our friend Aaron here without any evidence. In this post he was bemoaning a lack of aspiration to virtue rather than condemning any sin.

aaron said...

Thanks patrick. anonymous, I'm not casting any stones whatsoever, purely making an observation... anyway why do you not reveal yourself?!

Shan said...

I think anonymous has a point. Christopher Lee didn't become sinister after playing Saruman, nor did Ian McKellan become wisened after playing Gandalf. Actors play a role. The experience of pretending to be someone else, for better or worse, is going to necessarily affect their craft and their personal beliefs. Yet it doesn't follow that the actor will be overwhelmed by their role and cease being themselves, or internalise their character's persona.

(If so then keep the hell away from Eric Bana. Chopper, Hulk, Black Hawk Down and Troy? That dude must be one violent killer...)

Patrick said...

Hey, it doesn't hurt to have high expectations.

Just because we often fail to live up to the example of Mary or the saints doesn't make it less worthwhile a task or diminish them as role models.

Nor are role models simply meant to be mimicked without evaluating their virtue. I mean, isn't this whole saga a case in point??

Shan said...

Respectfully Patrick, the worthiness of imitating the saints is a different discussion.

Aaron lamented that Keisha Castle-Hughes didn't appear "to have got anything out of playing the part [of Mary]." One could argue that this statement is false in that Keisha, like Mary, became pregnant as a teen.

Anyway, a mimic is not an actor anymore than a budgie that speaks is an orator. Moreover actors portray characters - they do not become them. Is Andy Serkis really a giant gorilla or a deformed hobbit? Is Jim Caviziel really Christ? Is Christian Bale really Batman?

Of course not! Actors act out the character. They do not become the character. Any expectation to the contrary is immature and - honestly - quite stupid.

Sheesh!

Anonymous said...

Thanks Shan, you took the words right out of my mouth. Patrick, I didn't intend to imply vicious motives from Aaron. However, I did find the 'observation' to be quite judgemental. But then again I guess it's his blog so it conveys his thoughts on such matters. Furthermore, I don't seek to inforce my moral standards on others just as I don't I feel I should have other's standards expected of myself. Although, I do generally hope for some level of basic morality to be instilled in society such as mutual tolerance and respect for all people. I apologise if I have incited any offence. I was simply giving my opinion on the matter and sought only to further understand what was implied by the post and perhaps challenge the thought process behind it.

Patrick said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Patrick said...

Sorry that was me.

I just felt I needed to reply because I can feel the humour draining out of this post. Maybe I should recommend to him to ask his readers to have their laugh before reading these comments!

With respect, you guys have taken this way too seriously. The point I was making above is that people can learn virtues from the example of others, but of course we don't expect that they will, just as we don't always expect it of ourselves. It was the sheer ridiculousness and judgemental tone of delivering that point which was meant to be a mild form of self-deprecation on Aaron's part. I don't think you could describe Aaron as the moralising type - knowing this might have enabled you to look more lightheartedly on this post.

See, dissecting it this way makes it so much less fun...

only moniker said...

The thing is with actors, generally when they do a movie, they learn something about the characters they play. Honestly, how many interviews have you seen where the actor's asked about the character they play and how it relates to their own life?
I don't expect any actor to 'become' the character they play, just to learn from them (especially if it's some one edifying like Our Lady).

Shan said...

That's a fair point, but we don't know what direction she recieved on set. The production seems to be aiming for "realism" - but that could mean anything from ultramontane pietism to "Mary was raped by Pantera" 'rationalism'.

In short, we don't know - so we need to be charitable and not presume that playing the BVM would lead to imitating the BVM.

Cypressus III said...

Well Shan, it can happen. The effects on the actors who were in Mel Gibson's the passion is astounding, and demonstrates how such an enterprise can change people.

Monica is right- actors are always talking about how they 'become' their character, whatever that means. It is a very legitimate question.

In any case you are all, particlarly Shan and the nameless one, taking this way to seriously.

Patrick said...

Thanks Monica and Cypressus, I'm glad that some people agree with me.